Working with all members of the media is exciting, complex, intriguing.

Not so long ago meetings were held to discuss joint needs, requirements and deadlines. Now it is all done via email, WhatsApp and a variety of other social platforms. Nothing wrong with that except the loss of eye contact, body language and tone of voice.

These new platforms and apps save much time and probably money. Time is of the essence so getting that information out to your media contacts is a critical function and nothing beats  whizzing off emails for an instantaneous encounter.

What has been surprising when  trying to organise one-on-one meetings  with a journalist, editor, publisher or photographer and myself or myself and a client has been the sometimes absolute shock by some for a face to  face encounter. You would swear Facebook crashed or WhatsApp changed your profile picture without their consent and they know not what to expect.

Face to face enables you to connect properly (you can then continue electronically if you so desire but at least you have that plug-in). It enables you to raise questions and views in a way that social platforms may present a tone that is not intended. It alleviates any miss-communications or innuendoes.

Electronic communication has many benefits it eliminates time wasting. You can continue to work while waiting on a response or a download to drop into your inbox.

Interesting thought though – when you go to a function and you bump into a contact you have only communicated with via email etc, what do you do? Send them a WhatsApp or sms or maybe a cheeky Instagram of you both at the same function but never the vocal chords should exhale?

There is room for all the new technocomms. I believe nothing replaces at least one face to face. Before the advent of advanced technology we always had ONE meeting, if you didn’t like the face then the cell or phone was the way forward.

I love people. I love media people. Face to face is no facepalm – it is now an art.